Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Priestly Celibacy in a United Church

Can East and West coexist regarding married priests? Certainly, the relationship between the Eastern and Roman Catholic Churches on the issue of married clergy has seen an improvement over conditions that obtained throughout most of the 20th century. Still, there are many questions that remain that prevent a clear answer if conditions are such that West and East could peacefully live together with these two traditions in place.

Why must Eastern Catholics still live with restrictive rules regarding ordaining married men in many countries which have a large Roman Catholic presence? Would Orthodox need to live similarly in a reunited Church?
In a reunited Church, would the Latin Church feel a need to ask for special cooperation from the Eastern Churches on this issue? For example, would future candidates for ordination from Eastern Churches in a reunited Church need dispensations from Rome, thus ensuring, for example, that men from Western parishes weren’t going over to the East to get ordained?

Would ordinations of married men in Eastern Churches need to be done quietly? Or, could both Churches (West and East) live side-by-side with the differing traditions without any restrictions?


14 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  2. You bring up interesting thoughts that I never really considered as a Catholic of a different rite...thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is an interesting problem- how can we respect each others' traditions living side by side? My prayer- the Holy Spirit will guide us!

      Delete
  3. I think there isn't enough research, or awareness, regarding the matter. In each respective church, there's so much one person, or group can really catechize; the process would be prolonged to a great degree, almost endless; I think, in that case, catechesis really needs an overhaul, but that's something ive mentioned like an ongoing tape recorder, understanding we live in a different time, environment, and Ecclesiastical structure than days of yore.

    ReplyDelete
  4. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Um, Personal Ordinariate (formerly Anglican Rite). Many priests are former Episcopal clergy, with wives and children. No problems; people adjust.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. yes- this should be right...trust people and educate them about the different traditions!..but them it took SO long to say 'consubstantial' in the NO in English because 'the people won't understand....'

      Delete
  6. First, different rites exist with different norms, rules, liturgical rites etc... so why is it so difficult to adjust to the idea of married priests in the Eastern Catholic rites. Second, we had married priests in the Latin rite for close to or over 1000 years, so clearly it was once acceptable so why not again?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope you are right...but history hasn't been so kind- I am hopeful

      Delete
  7. It's interesting reading many accounts of Latin, or Roman rite priests saying good things about the Eastern tradition of married clergy: it should be retained, promoted, and exercised. One priest who said this; and provided a biblical account of what Paul looked for a Bishop, in a letter to Timothy (I think). The other is my parish priest, at St. Irene. I don't think priests would necessarily have a problem (unless I'm wrong). I think it more stems to a chunk of the laity who aren't aware, or just too set in their ways, regarding the issue of mandatory celibacy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. we have been fortunate in our dealings...it is basically very positive...but the reality is that we are 'second-class'- in the Roman-rite big time! At homeschool potlucks, they wait around for the 'real' priest to show up to bless the food (even though everybody calls my husband 'Father')- they just prefer their own- and that is okay!

      Education MUST happen- there have been many Roman-rite priests who have asked- so did you get married before or after he was ordained?

      Delete
    2. That's why I pray I don't get too ambitious, and greedy with the doors I do have open, at the local Roman parish, across town. I was entrenched in the Roman rite, until last year; and dove, all in, into Eastern Christianity.

      I would try to bring in the Eastern angle, when the opportunity presented, when I was tasked to oversee a small group, in a youth ministry.

      I also saw opportunities close, when I was helping a friend of mine, who teaches fourth grade catechism, so it goes both ways.

      As a the retired creator of Seal Team Six says: know your boundary makers, and breakers; and sometimes, the best action is none at all.

      Delete
  8. We are about to have a major opportunity to educate about this issue in my town because the local Byzantine parish is getting its first married pastor. He arrives with his wife and children next week. Hopefully all will go well. We also recently had a married man ordained for the Anglican Ordinariate.

    ReplyDelete
  9. We are about to have a major opportunity to educate about this issue in my town because the local Byzantine parish is getting its first married pastor. He arrives with his wife and children next week. Hopefully all will go well. We also recently had a married man ordained for the Anglican Ordinariate.

    ReplyDelete

I love comments! Contribute to the conversation so I am not talking to the ether! (posts older than 2 weeks will be moderated & posted ASAP)

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...